Being creative

One activity that I find relaxes me is being creative. This can involve sewing, card making, cooking and sometimes even producing resources for school.

Here are some cards I made recently:

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And a note pad board I made for having in the caravan:

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Sainsburys brighten up my cleaning

I found these cleaning cloths in Sainsburys and they do seem to make cleaning a  little less of a chore.

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Aren’t they smashing?

I’m back again

I have been working really hard lately so have had little time for blogging. But today, however, I’m at home with a really bad cold and throat so thought I’d spend some time catching up.

Have found this brilliant site  http://www.oldandinteresting.com/default.aspx

which is fascinating. Here are some previews:

Rag rugs, mats & carpets

Covering floors with woven, hooked, braided, prodded, or crocheted strips of cloth

rag strips in balls ready for rug makingSometimes it’s hard to be precise about the history and origins of simple domestic crafts and equipment. Writers weren’t usually interested in recording the details of everyday housekeeping and low-status domestic crafts until the 19th century. Even then we have limited descriptions of rag rug making before about 1900.

Many different cultures have found ways of recycling old bits of cloth into beautiful rugs, clothing and other items, but we know very little about the craft before 1800. Outside Asia the earliest rag floor coverings were probably woven from strips of cloth somewhere in Northern Europe, quite likely on a loom in Scandinavia where rug-making traditions are very strong. Even when we hear about old rugs, we have to remember it could be a bed-rug or coverlet. It’s unclear when people started to think of them primarily as floor-mats, but dictionary citations suggest it was during the 19th century.

advertisement with woman hanging white washing on line near tub of blue water Until the mid-20th century Reckitt’s blue-bags were well-known in many countries, sold as penny cubes to be wrapped in flannel or muslin, or sold ready bagged. It had various names over the years: Reckitt’s Blue, Bag Blue, Paris Blue, Crown Blue, Laundry Blue, Dolly Bags. The main ingredients were synthetic ultramarine and baking soda, and the original “squares” weighed an ounce.

bagged and labelled cylinders Reckitt’s had been in the blue and starch business in Hull even before they started importing French ultramarine in the 1850s to make the new blue rinse additive at their English HQ. They built up a major international brand, with various lesser rivals, notably Mrs. Stewart’s liquid bluing in the US, and Dolly Blue in the UK.

Reckitt’s wanted people to know their blue was used in the royal laundries, and Victorian advertising in the UK carried a recommendation from the Prince of Wales’ laundress.

Buy Reckitt’s Paris Blue in squares and beware of imitations
wrapper for Reckitt's Paris blue
I have been laundress to the Prince of Wales for several years, and I consider Reckitt’s Paris blue is the best I ever used, and is undoubtedly greatly superior to the old-fashioned thumb or dark blue.
Eliza Elder, April 12th, 1873

Price one penny the ounce
To be had of all respectable Grocers, Oilmen, and Druggists

Our weekend away

This weekend we went away in the new caravan. We had a great time and I certainly didn’t want to return home.sv202656

The camp site viewed from the caravan.

The scenery, viewed from the other side of the van

The scenery, viewed from the other side of the van

The caravan

The caravan

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February Shabbychic swap

I know it’s rather late but here are some photos of the goodies that Yvonne [Bliss] set me. By the way the heart shape chocs and lovehearts were eaten before I took the photos.

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My favourite is the crochet bookmark which as you can see, I use daily.

Leed’s Market photos

When Harry and I went to Leeds recently the taxi driver dropped us outside the indoor market and this is what we saw when we entered:

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We were so amazed by it all, that we didn’t look much at the actual stalls but spent the time looking at the roof!

From the outside it looked like this:

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I’m still here!!

Have just realised it is over a month since I last posted.  Life has been really hectic and we were away for a lot of half term. We went to Manchester to see father in law and then to Leeds to do some family history in the library. Made some useful break throughs and discovered another sister who died young , for my great, great grand father,

Discovered a lovely market in the centre of Leeds: [ will post some photos later]